How to Implement Kinder, Gentler Marketing: 4 All-Natural Truths

market without annoying your prospects and customers

I have a love/hate relationship with a soap company.

About five years ago, I stumbled across their products online. They boasted rare and unique scents and naturally-sourced ingredients. They were irresistible (to me, anyway). And their prices seemed reasonable.

So, I placed an order. And that’s when my troubles began.

I had to share my email address to complete my transaction. You know, to “receive an order confirmation.”

Within days, I found myself receiving marketing email after marketing email. Coupons. Special sales. New soaps. New scents. Free shipping.

I imagined their marketing department high-fiving one other and saying, “We’ve got one on the line. Quick! Reel her in!”

And you know what? The products I received were exceptional. They smelled amazing (I’m a sucker for a unique scent). So, I stuck it out for a while. But not forever.

Because I knew how wrong my experience was. I knew there was a better way to market your business. A kinder, gentler way – one that doesn’t alienate the very people you want to nurture.

Time went on.

I sent dozens of their catalogs to the landfill – a new one came in the mail every few weeks.

Finally, I gave up. After placing a few orders, I contacted the company and asked them to please – for the Love of All that Is Holy – stop sending me catalogs. I clicked the unsubscribe link in one of their many emails and used the form on their site to let them know why I was unsubscribing.

Then, I stopped hearing from them.

Here we go again: relearning a lesson

A lot has happened in the meantime. Life went on, and I forgot about this company’s overzealous marketing efforts.

A few weeks ago, when my husband asked me what I’d like for Mother’s Day, I said, “How about a gift certificate to (The Soap Company in Question)?” And my husband – smart man that he is – got me the gift certificate.

And guess what? It started all over again. Within just a couple of weeks, I have received three catalogs.

I take full responsibility for the situation. I got myself back on their radar and now I’m paying the price. I do still love their products, but I wish they understood modern marketing techniques as well as they clearly understand the soap business.

It’s obvious to me that they don’t read Copyblogger. Because if they did, they’d know the four basic truths of modern content marketing.

Let’s review them.

Truth #1: Content pulls; it doesn’t push

Rather than blanket prospects in catalogs and crowd their inboxes with sales emails, modern content marketing offers valuable, helpful, and even entertaining information.

The information is so helpful that prospects purposely sign up to receive it. And they stick around when the content they receive is consistently useful.

Read these posts to learn more about creating content that pulls (and doesn’t push):

Truth #2: Content offers; it doesn’t demand

Solid, effective content marketing doesn’t stomp its foot and demand in a whiny voice that you pay attention to it.

Instead, it confidently offers a hand – the exact information you need, right when you need it.

One way modern content marketers do this is by using marketing automation.

If my soap company had sent me a little brochure about how to save money on laundry day (and a coupon for their laundry soap), I would have held on to that piece of content. I might have posted it next to my washing machine! It wouldn’t have gone to a landfill like all those product catalogs.

Read these posts to learn more about making offers (not demands):

By the way, our Rainmaker Platform makes marketing automation a snap. :-)

Truth #3: Content entertains; it doesn’t annoy

One of the foundational truths about content marketing is that it must serve your audience if you want it to be effective (more on this below).

And one way to do this is to meet your audience – wherever they are – with content that is so compelling they want to consume it.

At Rainmaker Digital, we do just that with our podcast network, Rainmaker FM.

Podcasting isn’t a requirement, but it’s a great fit for those who are comfortable with audio – who are more comfortable talking than writing.

Read these posts to learn more about creating entertaining (not annoying) content:

Truth #4: Content is about the consumer, not the producer

Please repeat after me:

“I will resist the urge to constantly write about me, my offers, my company’s history, our goals, our mission statement, or our new products. Instead, I’m going to focus on writing about topics that serve my prospects and customers.”

It’s tough for traditional marketers to wrap their brains around this one. But your customers’ #1 concern isn’t you … it’s them.

That’s why, for example, if the soap company had sent me information about alternate ways to use their soaps (Perfume your pajama drawer! Hang one in your closet! Use it to repel mosquitos!), I would have stayed subscribed.

And an occasional offer woven into the helpful content wouldn’t have fazed me one bit.

A highly effective technique for serving your prospects’ and customers’ ongoing needs is creating a series of cornerstone content pages on your website.

Cornerstone pages serve up foundational information that your prospects and customers need to understand your field of expertise.

Read these posts to learn more about creating cornerstone content pages that serve your audience:

True confession

Here’s the painful truth: I spent the first part of my career creating exactly the kind of marketing materials my soap company is annoying me with now. Direct mail postcards. Sales catalogs. Promotional brochures.

But now I know there’s a better way. A kinder, gentler way to market your business, serve your prospects and customers, and create marketing that is valued, not sent straight to a landfill.

That’s the kind of marketing we teach inside our Authority program. To learn more about it, click the button below.

Learn to create kinder, gentler marketing

inside Authority

The post How to Implement Kinder, Gentler Marketing: 4 All-Natural Truths appeared first on Copyblogger.

Advertisements

The Advantages Of Solar LED Lights

//pagead2.googlesyndication.com/pagead/js/adsbygoogle.js

<ins class="adsbygoogle"

style=”display:inline-block;width:250px;height:250px”

data-ad-client=”ca-pub-7815236958543991″

data-ad-slot=”8717335615″>

(adsbygoogle = window.adsbygoogle || []).push({});

Supplanting your energy source and picking vitality lessening lighting choices can have an immense effect to your expenses and even offer you solid lighting particularly for your open air needs. There are such a large number of lighting options and sunlight based LED lights are a portion of as well as can be expected pick. This is on the grounds that they are financially savvy, as well as don’t require an excess of vitality to serve your necessities. Sun based LED lights use assets at an abnormal state, making them exceptionally useful when utilized as a part of various sources. You remain to appreciate various advantages when you select these lights for your utilization and they incorporate the accompanying.

1. Driven enlightenments are more viable

This is on account of the lights produce directional light bars superior to anything fluorescents. The lights likewise have low lumen yield appraisals making them perfect alternatives for open air light applications. Their aspect makes them very dependable notwithstanding amid dim sky days.

2. Sun powered LED lights have upgraded effectiveness

LEDs and sun powered cells share loads of attributes like they both require adjusting and sorting for execution to be upgraded. Sun powered LED lights need to adjust resistors since they are all around designed. They enhance light levels and current streams and this enormously enhances the general framework effectiveness.

3. They can be calibrated to address client issues

They are programmable and can be calibrated not at all like their ordinary lighting partners. They won’t just convey the light where it is required, however will likewise convey at once and levels that are required. This has diminished the sun oriented board size furthermore the battery limit by a colossal rate. You can choose a lighting profile that works for your application. You can likewise have custom profiles introduced to coordinate your undertaking nature and size when utilizing sun based LED lights.

4. You will appreciate developed battery runtime

Most galaxies today have tended to battery drops that are normal with the frameworks. When you pick a sunlight based LED light that is deliberately organized, you will appreciate highlights tending to framework cost, siting issues and board size to ensure that your definite needs are fulfilled. At the point when the framework operation is guided by the precise needs, you have nearby, then you can make certain to appreciate expanded run time of the battery making them entirely dependable.

5. You show signs of improvement execution even in icy climate

Sun powered LED lights and sunlight based cells offer enhanced execution, effectiveness and even lifetime administration amid colder temperatures, making them profitable contrasted with other light sorts whose lifetime and execution drop amid colder atmospheres like DC fluorescent. A sun based LED light can last up to ten times longer as DC fluorescent in these frosty situations making it more dependable.

Sun powered LED lights come in various styles and outlines and in addition sizes, making it workable for you to pick the lights that are most suited for your open air needs. It begins by considering the lighting prerequisites you have in your space before then selecting the best lights.

Sun based LED lights are unquestionably worthwhile yet you should likewise guarantee that you get your lights from dependable sources to appreciate all the advantages.

Rainmaker Rewind: Henry Rollins on Entrepreneurial Art

Rainmaker FM rewind

We have a special treat for you on Rainmaker FM this week …

Music legend and entrepreneur Henry Rollins joins Brian Clark on Unemployable to discuss how his career (including his role as frontman of Black Flag) has thrived due to a DIY-producer ethic, why he formed his own publishing company, and how he became a self-made media personality.

There’s a lot of other great content on the network these days, so be sure to check out the rest of the shows highlighted in this week’s edition of Rainmaker Rewind.

unemployable-061-2

  1. Unemployable. Henry Rollins joins Brian Clark for a second time to discuss music, entrepreneurship, and the art of self-promotion: Henry Rollins on Entrepreneurial Art
  2. Copyblogger FM. Sonia Simone dives into why focusing on email opt-ins is one of the most important content marketing practices: Content Marketing Best Practices: Getting Email Opt-Ins
  3. The Digital Entrepreneur. Brian Clark and Jerod Morris explain how you should be using social media to connect with your audience: Does Your Social Media Strategy Need a Mindset Shift?
  4. Hack the Entrepreneur. Jon Nastor chats with Paul Kortman about the transition from office life to entrepreneur life: The Reluctant Path to Becoming an Entrepreneur
  5. Elsewhere. Charlie Gilkey welcomes Sonia Simone to The Creative Giant Show to chat about marketing, careers, and digital business: Sonia Simone on The Creative Giant Show
  6. The Missing Link. Jabez Lebret and Steve Anderson discuss building authority and becoming an influencer on LinkedIn: An Influencer’s Guide to Building Your Authority on LinkedIn
  7. Zero to Book. Jeff Goins and Pamela Wilson review the various means of publishing and identify which route is ideal for authors – especially first-timers: Artisanal Publishing and the Hidden Power of the Beginner’s Mind
  8. The Showrunner. Jerod Morris and Jon Nastor explain how and why booking guests for your podcast is well-worth the sometimes overly complicated booking process: How to Execute Engaging Podcast Interviews
  9. Confessions of a Pink-haired Marketer. Sonia Simone talks web traffic, sales pages, and the one element you need to master if you want your content to work: The Context of a Successful Content Strategy: The Harpoon and the Net
  10. Youpreneur. Chris Ducker shares the top five reasons why originality is so important in business and gives away one of the keys to long-term business success: How Being ‘Original’ Can Boost Your Business Faster than Anything

And, one more thing …

If you want to get my Rainmaker Rewind picks of the week sent straight to your favorite podcast player, subscribe right here on Rainmaker FM.

See you next week.

The post Rainmaker Rewind: Henry Rollins on Entrepreneurial Art appeared first on Copyblogger.

The Price of Digital Commerce Academy Goes Up Today

digital commerce academy - last day to save big

The day I first told you about last week is now here.

It’s Friday, May 27, 2016 … which means that the price you will pay for an annual investment in Digital Commerce Academy goes up today at 5:00 p.m. Pacific Time (6:00 p.m. Mountain Time, 7:00 p.m. Central Time, 8:00 p.m. Eastern Time).

The current price is $395 per year. That’s still our early adopter introductory price.

Today at 5:00 p.m. Pacific Time, the price will go up to $595 per year.

The crazy thing about the price is that when we start selling the full courses that are inside of Academy on their own, we’ll charge $495 per course. So the current annual price ($395) is less than the price of one course – and you get immediate access to all four courses.

Plus, you get access to all of the courses we add in the future, plus all of the weekly case studies and coaching Q&As, as well as the community. And it’s a fact … current members tell us that these aspects of Academy are even more valuable than the courses!

To get started with Digital Commerce Academy right now, so you can lock in the low price (for the lifetime of your account, even when the price raises again, which it will), click the button below:

Digital Commerce Academy

Build the Digital Business of Your Dreams

If you’re interested in creating digital products, please don’t hesitate. Your first step will never be this affordable again.

So take this step (before the price goes up), or keep hoping and wishing you’ll someday have the digital business of your dreams, instead of doing what you probably already know you should be doing … which is actually building it.

We’re here to help you with the how, which can sometimes be tricky without a proven plan and some ongoing guidance. We know. We’ve been there. :-)

I hope you’ll take us up on this offer to help.

Click here to learn more about Digital Commerce Academy and join today.

Take action today. Lock in the low price. Then take your next step by digging into the course or case study that is most appropriate for you at this moment.

There’s zero risk with our no-questions-asked 30-day refund policy. Try Academy out and see what you think:

http://digitalcommerce.com/academy/

I’m looking forward to interacting with you inside Digital Commerce Academy!

The post The Price of Digital Commerce Academy Goes Up Today appeared first on Copyblogger.

7 Types of Emails to Send Customers to Keep Them Coming Back

As everyone says…

You need to build an email list.

Email marketing provides the highest ROI for most businesses at $40 for every $1 spent (on average).

image08

I’m sure you see a ton of content on a regular basis that shows you different ways to build that email list. Great.

But how much do you see that tells you how to interact with that list effectively?

I think it’s safe to guess not much.

I wouldn’t be surprised if you had questions such as:

  • What do I send my subscribers?
  • How do I keep open rates high?
  • How do I make my emails exciting?

While I can’t show you all of that in a single post, I’m going to show you 7 different types of emails that most businesses can send.

These types of emails are emails that your subscribers and customers will enjoy getting, will interact with, and will help you build strong relationships. 

1. Exclusive offers make subscribers feel special (but which kinds are best?)

It’s nice when someone, whether a close friend or a relative stranger, goes out of their way to do something nice for you.

As a website owner with an email list, you’re hopefully somewhere in the middle of that friend-stranger spectrum in the eyes of your subscribers.

If you can do something for your subscribers that they really appreciate, it will do many important things:

  • Make them think more highly of you
  • Make them more loyal (to stay a subscriber and to buy in the future)
  • Make them more willing to reciprocate (if you ask for a share, referral, or something else).

The question then is: what can you give them?

For most businesses, an exclusive offer is the best thing they can give.

Let’s go through a few real examples and then some more general situations.

First, you can offer a live event that only your subscribers are invited to. Not only will the event be valuable because it’s live, but it will also be well attended because it’s exclusive.

Bryan Harris often does this, so it must work well for him. For example, here is an email with an offer to attend a private mastermind:

image04

He sends a few emails leading up to the event and one or two at the last minute. They aren’t complicated-just a brief description of what to expect in the event.

What else can you offer subscribers? Another thing of value that doesn’t cost you much, if anything, is early access.

Matthew Barby created a WordPress plugin and sent this email to his subscribers, giving them free access to it:

image06

That’s a pretty sweet offer. In reality, Matthew is also gaining his first group of users, which is another win for him.

If you’re launching any big guides or tools, consider getting early feedback from your subscribers.

What else can you offer?

  • Discounts
  • Secret products (like limited one-on-one consulting)
  • Webinars
  • A sneak peak at original research
  • Free samples

Be creative. If you can think of any other ideas, tell me about them in a comment at the end of the article.

2. Give subscribers the gift of convenience

Take care of your subscribers because your list is one of the most valuable assets you own.

You can give value in many ways. Some may be big gestures (email type #1), but even small things go a long way.

If someone is on your list, that means they’ve already told you that they like your content (if they signed up from a blog post, for example).

However, just because they want to hear your thoughts and advice doesn’t mean all your subscribers want it in the same way.

Typically, you’ll email all your subscribers about any new content you create. When you do this, consider giving them alternative ways to consume the content. Make it as convenient as you can.

For example, Tim Urban created a long post about SpaceX. He then sent out this email to subscribers:

image07

On top of the regular link that he had already sent his subscribers, he sent this email with two other options: a PDF version and an audio version.

It takes a fraction of the time to re-create the original content in a different form, but it adds a lot of extra value.

Nathan Barry offers another way to make your content more convenient.

After he hosts a webinar, he uploads it to YouTube and sends an email with a link to all his subscribers.

image09

It’s something that I know most subscribers really appreciate, and it also exposes his webinar to those subscribers who forgot to sign up for the event.

Convenience typically comes in the form of different mediums of content.

If you wrote a blog post, particularly a long one, consider emailing it to your subscribers with more than one version:

  • PDF
  • a cheat sheet
  • audio version
  • video summary

Or if you created a video, reformat that into:

  • an e-book
  • an MP3 download
  • a video download
  •  a cheat sheet/summary

You don’t need to create all the formats. Just think about which ones your subscribers would like most and which make sense for the content you made.

3. Short value emails can be a nice change of pace

Think about your subscribers’ email boxes.

Day after day, they get several emails from friends, families, and businesses they like.

What do most of the business emails consist of?

  • “Read our content”
  • “Buy our stuff”

About 90% of business emails fall into these two categories.

And it’s not that those types of emails aren’t valuable to your subscribers-because they are, but some subscribers will get fatigued by them.

If you’re looking to maximize your subscriber happiness as much as possible, consider sending emails that focus on nothing but teaching something interesting to your subscribers.

No links to your content or anyone’s website.

No asking for replies-just a clear show of value.

Bernadette Jiwa is known for her story-telling talent.

She sends out this exact type of email I’m talking about on a regular basis. Sometimes her emails have links underneath, and sometimes they don’t.

Here’s an example of such an email (yes, that’s the whole thing):

image03

It’s short but gives her subscribers an interesting thing to ponder, which helps them tell better stories (their goal).

It’s a nice break from overwhelming amounts of content (which I may be guilty of myself).

4. Highlights need to be interesting

Email newsletters are nothing new.

Any email sent out on a regular basis that summarizes what’s been happening on a site can be considered an email newsletter.

They’re supposed to consist of highlights.

But like the name implies, they need to consist of the very best of your site.

Whether you have user-generated content or content produced by your writing team, highlight emails are an option.

However, make sure you’re not including everything. But don’t select content randomly either.

You should be giving previews of the most popular content on your site for that particular time period.

For example, Quora (the question and answer site), regularly sends users the most upvoted questions from their feeds.

Here’s what it looks like:

image00

I would guess that these are automatically generated by the most upvoted questions during the week.

5. One way to show that you really respect subscribers

One goal that every email marketer should have is to form deeper relationships with subscribers.

Admittedly, this is difficult. It’s tough to break down that barrier over email only. You’ve probably never met your subscribers, and by default, they think of you as just another business.

Even if they like your business, most subscribers will still be skeptical about your claim that you care about them and not just their money.

One thing I encourage businesses to do is find employees through their email list.

I’ve done it before, as have many others. Here’s an example of Ramit Sethi sending an email to his list while looking to hire for more than 10 positions:

image10

When you do this, you make it clear that you think of them as people whom you respect and who you believe have valuable skills.

And it’s good business too. Your subscribers likely have an in-depth understanding of your business and obviously think in similar to you ways (since they like you).

Even if someone doesn’t apply or doesn’t get hired, it’s clear to them that you’re looking to develop partnerships and relationships with people on your list.

It’s one way to break down that barrier a bit and become more than “just another business.”

6. Don’t fall victim to the “curse of knowledge” (deliver your best stuff)

Many bloggers suffer from the “curse of knowledge.”

The curse of knowledge is a fairly old concept. It basically states that it’s hard to understand what lesser-informed people are thinking.

If you’re an expert in math, it would be hard for you to even fathom that someone doesn’t understand something like basic calculus.

It’s the reason why some people are geniuses but absolutely awful teachers. Conversely, someone who just learned something can often teach it best because they understand the perspective of someone who doesn’t know it.

Let’s apply this to your subscribers and content.

Over the years, you might write hundreds of pieces of content. At that point (possibly present day), you’re naturally going to assume that your average new subscriber is more informed than they used to be.

For me, as an example, it’s easy to assume that every new subscriber understands on-page and off-page SEO as well as concepts such as white-hat and black-hat link building.

From that perspective, it’s hard for me to send them my advanced guide to SEO because I’m assuming they already know everything in it.

Chances are, though, your average new subscriber won’t change much over time.

And it’s very likely that my average new subscriber could benefit from more general SEO knowledge before I get to the specific tactics I currently write about.

The autoresponder “crash course”: If you think that this is a problem, one way to fix it is with an autoresponder sequence.

Think of what an average subscriber knew even a year or two ago, and make a list of what they need to learn to get up to speed with the rest of your content.

Then, put together an autoresponder sequence that you send to all new subscribers, where you showcase your old content that teaches these basic concepts.

For example, if you sign up for Wordstream’s list, a PPC optimization business, you’ll get a few emails like this:

image05

The guides are all older content, and the field may have advanced since it was written, but the fundamentals hold true, and new subscribers will greatly appreciate learning them.

The takeaway from the “curse of knowledge” is that you’re probably giving subscribers a bit too much credit. Don’t assume they’ve read every single post you’ve ever written-because they haven’t.

Don’t be afraid to send emails featuring the best of your older content.

7. Preview big events that subscribers will be interested in (be your own hype man)

You need to give subscribers incentives to open that next email.

There are many ways to do this, but one way is to build hype in advance.

Think about any popular TV show. They show previews for the next episode in commercials and at the end of episodes.

These get you excited, and you make sure you watch the next episode.

Brian Dean does a similar thing really well, but for content.

For example, he sent this email to subscribers:

image02

In that email, he shared his story about struggling and then finally succeeding with SEO.

It’s an interesting story that draws you in and makes you curious about the specifics of his success (building hype).

At the bottom of the email, he teases subscribers with bullet points that outline what he’s going to show them over the next few emails:

image01

Right at the end, after building that hype, he tells them to watch out for his next email in which he’ll send the first post about how to succeed with SEO like he did.

You’d better believe that he had a fantastic open rate on that email.

You can do the same. When you’re planning to publish a big piece of content or a new tool, first send an email that focuses on the benefits of it.

If possible, tie it into an entertaining story to suck in your subscriber even more. That will only add to the anticipation.

Conclusion

It’s not enough just to build an email list-you have to use it effectively.

Emails are a great personal way to communicate with subscribers and customers.

Use as many of these 7 types of emails (where they make sense) to start building more meaningful relationships.

If you’re having trouble deciding exactly what to send to your subscribers, just fill me in on your situation in a comment below, and I’ll point you in the right direction.

Landing Pages Defined in 60 Seconds [Animated Video]

content marketing glossary - what are landing pages?

You’ve probably heard us talk about landing pages a lot around here.

There is a good reason for that.

When executed correctly, a landing page is a powerful tool that helps you gain new subscribers, sell your products, and more.

But what exactly is a landing page?

Watch our short, fun video about landing pages

With help from our friends at The Draw Shop, we whipped up 12 definitions from our new Content Marketing Glossary into short, fun whiteboard animated videos.

Here’s our video for the definition of a landing page:

Animation by The Draw Shop

And for those of you who would prefer to read, here’s the transcript:

A landing page is any page on a website where traffic is sent specifically to prompt a certain action or result. Think of a golf course … a landing page is the putting green that you drive the ball, or prospect, to.

Once on the green, the goal is to put the little white ball in the hole in the grass. Likewise, the goal of the copy and design of a landing page is to get the prospect to take your desired action.

The goal could be to sell a product. It could be to get email newsletter sign-ups. It could be to download an ebook. Watch a video. Sign a petition.

The variety of landing page goals is endless, but the important thing to remember is to have one goal per landing page.

One page, one goal. Nothing more.

Share this video

Click here to check out this definition on YouTube and share it with your audience. You’ll also find 11 additional Content Marketing Glossary videos.

Learn more from the Content Marketing Glossary

We’ll feature the rest of the videos soon, but if you’d prefer not to wait, you can watch all the videos now by going directly to the Content Marketing Glossary.

If you would like to learn more about landing pages, visit these three resources:

By the way, let us know if you have any definitions you’d like us to add to the glossary! Just drop your responses in the comments below.

The post Landing Pages Defined in 60 Seconds [Animated Video] appeared first on Copyblogger.

How to Calm Your Content Anxiety in 5 Simple Steps

5 ways to create content deliberately

It was an early morning of coffee, loud music, and blasting the internet with everything I could muster.

I had already published a few articles on my website, skipping the draft process. Then I scrambled to share them on every social media network and group chat that I could think of.

Twitter, Facebook, Google+, LinkedIn, Slack channels, Facebook groups, email newsletter(s) – you know the drill.

It was a copy/paste nightmare, but that’s what the “experts” had told me to do. The familiar phrases of “Content is king!” and “Blog every day!” were among the many maxims running through my mind that morning.

We are often told that your frequent presence online is vitally important. More interaction, more connection, more conversion.

This is partially true, but experience has taught me that excessive presence damages both your authority and your own personal fulfillment.

More content is not always better content

I was on a content-production rampage during this particular reinvention (yes, I’ve done this “online thing” quite a few times, and from scratch). Yet, I was just as internally frustrated as when I wasn’t producing any content at all.

The problem – obvious now in hindsight – is that more does not always mean better.

It’s the most basic of truths, known by everyone you’ve ever met, yet contrary to the mainstream teachings of many online “gurus.”

Instead of wasting your time with fruitless effort, here are five steps that will help calm your content anxiety and safeguard you against our shared tendency to believe frequency trumps quality.

Step #1: Adopt the “One-day-queue” rule

Slowing down might sound easy, but it’s far from it.

If you’re like me, your typical routine is to go from inspiration to creation to production in the same morning (thanks to that gallon of coffee).

That habit makes sense when you’re passionate about your project. Unfortunately, it may stunt your capacity to produce meaningful work for your audience.

Instead, live by what I call the “one-day-queue” rule:

When you are inspired, resist the urge to create and publish on the same day.

This includes blog posts too  –  don’t rush to publish an idea that you haven’t fully developed.

Hold back to ensure you’re publishing the most relevant, useful content.

Step #2: Work with an editor

If you write any type of content, working with an editor should be a priority.

Your editor can shield you from your own impulsiveness and prevent you from publishing a post on your blog or sending your email newsletter in a fury.

When you get in the habit of having someone else review your content before you publish, you’re forced to slow down your process.

Editors also don’t have to be expensive. If you ask a friend, coworker, or family member, he or she might even review your work for free to support you.

An “editor” who has an eye for polished content will help you craft your best work – and any cost will  be money well-spent.

Step #3: Schedule social media updates

This is quite difficult for me because I impulsively tweet a lot, but scheduling your social media updates helps you practice something I like to call “funneling your impulse.”

What do I mean by that?

Let’s say you’re scanning – you guessed it – your Twitter timeline, and you get an idea for a tweet.

Instead of satisfying the urge to post that tweet immediately, funnel your impulse through a filter by scheduling it for at least 10 minutes in the future.

In that time, you might rethink posting that tweet and therefore have time to delete or rephrase it.

That’s an option you wouldn’t have had if you just impulsively posted the tweet.

Step #4: Learn the art of observation

Simply observing may be difficult for some creatives, but it’s undeniably required.

Discovering and examining your audience’s needs will help you serve them better.

Spend more time watching and less time building.

Don’t build for the sake of production; build for the sake of creating a solution.

Solve your audience’s problems, and you won’t have to shout so loud.

Step #5: Focus on the entire process, not just the product

I once mentioned in a newsletter email on mobile-first design that web designers should focus more on the process than the product.

It’s understandable that we have a natural tendency to be preoccupied with that glorious finished product – part of the process, even.

But our motivator can often become a distraction and we neglect other important steps.

Aim to balance the time you spend on your marketing efforts and creating your products.

Better content, at a manageable pace

Following these guidelines has allowed me to craft high-quality content at a more regular pace, and with less effort.

I don’t write a blog post and publish it the same day, or blast out an email prematurely, just to find several typos in each of them the next day.

Instead, I feel confident knowing that the content I do publish (or cancel) has been carefully reviewed.

In turn, those who follow me receive better content, read articulated and refined writing, and experience an overall stronger presentation.

The post How to Calm Your Content Anxiety in 5 Simple Steps appeared first on Copyblogger.